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Ways of Teaching Vocabulary Using Reading Material

There are many ways to learn vocabulary. With easy access to a electronic dictionaries, internet, etc, using a dictionary has become very easy and fast. So why shouldn’t language learners use them?

Well sometimes they ARE the right thing to use, but overuse can actually slow down language learning. There are in fact a number of reasons why this is the case. Read this post here for one reason why bilingual dictionary learning has its limitations. Of the other reasons, the most powerful reason why we should encourage language learners to limit their limit dictionary work is that over reliance on them can dull their minds. Consider what one would have to do if there were no dictionaries, which in fact was exactly the case for ALL of us when we learned our first language. How do you think we did it? There was no Matrix like download! All we had at our disposal was our mind…and we learned all we had to without dictionaries!!

So, in preparation for the session on “How to convert any class reading material into a vocabulary learning resource“, I have created an exercise that I would like you to do. Doing this before the session on August 12th will enable us to progress far further on the day. So here are the instructions:

  1. Read this amazing story about an a mother and her son for yourself.
    If some of the words or expressions are a problem for you, I will make a suggestion. Do read the whole article first to get a sense of the meaning of the article. And only look more deeply into the words, etc
  2. Once you have done that find 5 words or expressions in the article that you think your students might struggle with and highlight them or write them down.
  3. Have a think about what you might do to help your students figure out the meanings without using a dictionary
  4. Be prepared to share what you have found. You will of course not be required to do that, but that will help discussions we have to be in more depth and valuable.
  5. If you could write the words down in the comments below that would be great. Will help others and also give me a better idea of what the problems might be for teachers and their students from around the planet.

I look forward to catching up with you all on August 12

 

  • miriam lozada says:

    These are my five words. I picked these four words and idiom. I am sure my middle school students would probably have problem with other words, but I chose these five, because I think they are less common.

    scarce

    vowed

    reassuring

    turning point

    embedded

    In order to explain my student what these five pieces of vocabulary mean I will use flashcards, pictures or real life examples.

    For instance in order to make them understand the meaning of the words scarce I could use as example the current situation of our country in which some of the most wanted food items are missing from the shelves in food markets

  • Rosana Baraldi says:

    The words the students would probably have a problem with are:

    1- bring out

    2- vowed

    3- pitch in

    4- prevail

    5-revenues

    To make sure my students would understand the new vocabulary I would use real examples, trying to use the new words into their personal lives, so that would be easier for them to memorize and relly learn the new vocabulary.

  • Oksana says:

    I’ll take the following 5 words that could be a problem for my students:
    1. scarce
    2. promissory note
    3. embedded
    4. prevail
    5. revenue

    First of all I’d try to make them guess the meaning of the words just looking at the
    context.

    In the first case with SCARCE I’d draw their attention to the contrast made by the adjective ABUNDANT in the second part of the sentence. Food was scarce – love and
    devotion were abundant. If it’s still not clear then easier synonyms can be used like LITTLE FOOD BUT LOTS OF LOVE. Using gestures is also appropriate here as notions like “little” or “lots of” are very easy to demonstrate.

    So we could start with guessing and using some help tools like explaining the meaning in other words or giving suggestive examples like for EMBEDDED – EMBEDDED CODE that may be known for computer literate students, then we could proceed with various possible tools and sometimes end with translation into the students’ native language. Say, in the case with PROMISSORY NOTE it’s quite easy to guess the meaning from the stems of the words and just take it as “a paper promising to give you the money in the future” but as that presents a special term from finance and accounting sphere and is an official document
    rather than just a paper note I think that the exact equivalent in students’
    native language may be given or the use of a dictionary can be justified here.

    Finally I’d strongly recommend them to write down the word combinations where these words are used just next to the words that are difficult to understand. Ex. EMBEDDED – WORDS DEEPLY EMBEDDED IN MY SOUL and so on. In this way there’s much more chance to remember them with the context.

  • Valentina Saliy says:

    The story is interesting. A human has always to believe in his own forces. It’s great when ur close ppl like parents help u to believe in itself.I think these words would be hard for my students to understand:
    1 scarce (food was scarce)
    2 disten for greatness
    3 pitch in
    4 promissory notes
    5 embed in 
    First, I’d ask my students to guess from this context, what they think. After that, if I see they have got these in a wrong way I’ll explain their meanings via different situations.

  • Philip Davaraj says:

    Pre-class Assignment from Philip Davaraj

    These are the four words and a phrasal verb that my
    students would probably need help to understand.

    Realized
    Founder
    Growing up
    Lap
    Revenue

    The word “realized” has a false friend in
    German language “ realisieren”. In our context that is not the meaning.

    This will certainly cause them problem to
    guess the correct meaning. So here I will have to give lot of other examples to
    understand the correct meaning.

    To understand the word “Founder” I will ask
    them to wait and I will also ask them to read the last paragraph again and
    again. There is the word “founded” and if they have understood that word, then
    they could now guess the meaning of the word “founder” easily.

    Many of my German students have problems
    with phrasal verbs. So they won’t be able to understand this or guess the
    meaning of this verb that easily. Here I will have to teach them first some phrasal
    verbs and then by giving lot of examples
    for phrasal verbs, I will help them to guess the meaning.

    To help them to understand the word “Lap”, I
    will explain the noun “Laptop”. I will ask why a notebook is called a
    laptop? Now they will get the point.

    Revenue
    is business vocabulary. So this can be explained very easily and my
    students will also guess the meaning quickly.

  • amalia says:

    Amalia
    The words that would be a problem for my students are:
    1. embedded
    2. pitch in
    3. prevail
    4. vowed
    5. sake
    What I would do is to show them that the context has the meanings, for example scarce wouldn’t be a problem as its opposite is in the same sentence. Also I would give them some synonyms and ask them to make sense of them in the passage.

  • Shawqi Shamiri says:

    There were almost 14 words that could be a problem for my students as
    they are new for them and not included in the school syllabi. However, I will
    choose the most 5 problematic words for them:

    scarce

    a meat-packing plant

    promissory

    revenues

    vowed

    To get students understand them without using a dictionary, first of all
    I’ll get them elicit the part of speech from context, then read the context
    again, guide them to link between the new words and some words in the context
    to grasp the idea, hence the meaning. If it doesn’t work, I will highlight
    their synonyms and/or antonyms. For the idioms, I might illustrate them, give multiple
    definitions with/or examples and get students find the suitable definition referring
    to the context in which the idiom was used in the text. I may translate the
    idioms into their first language for better understanding of their use and
    function.

  • Nwar Ahmed A.Al-Rahmman Al-Had says:

    How to convert any class reading material into a
    vocabulary resource

    1-
    Really , it is a very motivated
    story to go towards the succeed and not surrender yourself to failure whatever
    the circumstances are.

    2-
    a) drove that message so deep into
    my heart

    b) walking on my own

    c) the first to pitch in

    d) She worked behind the desk

    e) deeply embedded in my soul

    3-
    first I’ll explain the concept of
    “idiom”

    Next I’ll ask Ss to guess the meaning of the written expressions.

    Then I try to explain them by using simple words with :


    Body language ( gestures and facial
    expressions)


    Brain storming from the students


    Reference to famous people (Ss know)
    in real life

    (Note: if Ss can’t get the real meaning,
    I may use L1.)

    4-
    Sure, I’m ready to share what I have
    found with my colleagues.

    5-
    In my opinion, if the teacher himself
    /herself doesn’t know the real meaning of the key words or expressions is the
    main problem. Then if the teacher is not experienced or has no multi-abilities.

  • Valentina Saliy says:

    Shawqi, sorry but ‘promissory+note’ – written promise to pay or repay a specified sum of money at a stated time or on demand. Also called note of hand.

  • Diaw Djiby says:

    My students may struggle with these five words:
    to bring out in somebody
    a widow
    to take a leave
    the gret Depression
    to pitch in
    To ghelp them grasp the meaning of these words ,or expressions, I will explicit them by examples of my own and then from students themselves

  • Diaw Djiby says:

    My students may struggle with these five words:
    to bring out in somebody
    a widow
    to take a leave
    the gret Depression
    to pitch in
    To ghelp them grasp the meaning of these words ,or expressions, I will explicit them by examples of my own and then from students themselves

  • eduardo morales says:

    awesome story i´d never heard it, the words which would be difficult for my students are:
    lap
    pitch
    embedded
    achieving
    dried
    and i think the first action could be doing a mimic, after that i would give them sinonims and another sentences they can use the words,finally i could make a draw.
    i liked your slogan about passionate thanks for sharing.

  • Borbala Gaspar says:

    Borbala Gaspar

    1. remotely

    2. pitch in

    3. promissory notes

    4. prevail

    5. revenues

    To help student understand the vocabulary I would write on the board more example sentences with the words.

    AS:

    1. I am not remotely interested in doing my homework.

    2. I am ready to pitch into the game. or Mark, can you help us out? Yes, I am glad that I can pitch in!

    3. I cannot pay you tonight! But I can write you a promissory note! Will you accept it?

    4. The champion prevailed, though it was a hard fight. We will prevail this harsh period, you will see!

    5. What sort of annual revenue is likely to be required for commercial services to be viable?
    How much was the revenue of this company last year? Did they have a large income?

  • Borbala Gaspar says:

    1. remotely

    2. pitch in

    3. promissory notes

    4. prevail

    5. revenues

    To help student understand the vocabulary I would write on the board more example sentences with the words.

    AS:

    1. I am not remotely interested in doing my homework.

    2. I am ready to pitch into the game. or Mark, can you help us out? Yes, I am glad that I can pitch in!

    3. I cannot pay you tonight! But I can write you a promissory note! Will you accept it?

    4. The champion prevailed, though it was a hard fight. We will prevail this harsh period, you will see!

    5. What sort of annual revenue is likely to be required for commercial services to be viable? How much was the revenue of this company last year? Did they have a large income?

  • Alexandra Victorovna says:

    I think the story is interesting .The words the
    students would probably have a problem with are:

    1
    scarce (food was scarce)

    2-revenues

    3
    pitch in

    4 promissory notes

    5 embed in

    To make sure my students would understand the new
    vocabulary I would use real examples, using the new words into their personal
    lives simplified memorizing and learning the new vocabulary. Also I will use
    flashcards, pictures or real life examples.

    For instance in order to make them understand the
    meaning of the words scarce I could use as example the current situation of our
    country in which some of the most wanted food items are missing from the
    shelves in food markets

  • nazira says:

    In my opinion the following expressions and words would be hard for my students to understand:

    people bring out the best in you in a way

    are destined for greatness

    remotely

    doubters

    embedded.

    At first I try to explain them in context, find the
    links between words in the sentence.

    Then I give synonyms, create my own simple sentences
    with the unknown words. At last I try to
    act or mime them.

  • Aubrey says:

    scare
    destined
    predicted failure
    remotely similar
    destined

    Using context clues, using unfamiliar words in sentences will help the students understand teh meaning of words without looking up in the dictionary.

  • Nataly Ivlieva says:

    In my opinion the following expressions and words would be hard for my students to understand:
    remotely
    to pitch in
    embedded in
    vowed
    scarce

    At first I try to explain them in context, then I give synonyms, create my own simple sentence with the unknown words.

  • Fatima F. says:

    These are the words and expressions that, I think, may pose difficulty for my students:

    1-Bring out the best in (someone)

    2-Great Depression

    3-Turning point

    4-To pitch in

    5-To prevail

    the most effective strategy I can use , in this case, to help my students determine the meanings of these words is “Context Clues”. Because texts are full of “clues” about the meanings of words , I will ask them to look for clues in a sentence or in a paragraph in order to determine the meanings of unfamiliar words.

  • Nadina Nicolici says:

    The words / expressions my students may have problems with are:
    1. widow
    2. scarce
    3. to be willing to
    4. to take a leave of absence
    5. cash was so short
    I would try to make my students work out the meaning in the context. I would give them new examples where these are used, synonyms and opposites. Then, to make sure they got the meaning of the new vocabulary, I would use meaning check questions.

  • Katharina G. says:

    Hello!

    here are my suggestions:
    1) Words /expressions to struggle with

    – scarce
    – badly enough
    – second-rate accommodation
    – leave of absence
    – mother’s sake

    I would explain to them these using other words or examples, opposites or synonymes, gestures (sitting on her lap), and the group work. What ideas they have about, how they would explain to their collegues the words.

  • Slavka Borislavova says:

    1. a leave of absence; 2. for my mother’s sake; 3. turning point; 4. nationwide; 5. promissory notes
    I think to explain the meaning of the words and expressions with simpler words which my pupils already know.

  • Linda P. says:

    Dear Andrew, than you for sharing this story with us, it might be a great motivator for my students providing more than a mere language exercise. The vocabulary the students might find difficult varies greatly depending on their level. Let’s say my A2/B1 Ss would struggle with:
    scarce
    devotion
    abundant
    varying
    determined
    and also the expressions Fatima mentioned below.
    I would also use context and being a fan of the direct method, I would ask them to find e.g. opposites, synonyms, etc. and then retell/rewrite or both, the story using their own language and trying to practice using the new set of words as well.

  • Natalya Tarasova says:

    1) scarce, abundant, vowed, to pitch in, remotely.

    Usually I try to give my ss more examples with new words or use synonyms and antonyms.

  • Natalya Tarasova says:

    1) scarce, abundant, vowed, to pitch in, remotely.

    Usually I try to give my ss more examples with new words or use synonyms and antonyms.

  • Fernando Heredia Sánchez says:

    Hi, everyone.
    In my opinion, these words or expressions might be a problem for learners:
    1.- Reassuring
    2.- Promissory notes
    3.- To pitch in
    4.- Took a leave of absence from her job
    5.- Turning point
    I’d try to explain the meaning of these words in context using examples and synonims.

  • Mirjana Dobric says:

    Hello! Here are my words:
    -scarce
    -abundant
    -varying
    -doubter
    -promissory
    I would try to explain the meanings of these words through various contexts or give the students synonyms and opposites.

  • Tatiana Nedelina says:

    First of all, thank you for sharing such an inspiring story: I am sure my students will love it!
    They will definitely understand the overall meaning but might stumble over the following words:
    1. scarce
    2. abundant
    3. to vow
    4. to pitch in
    5. revenues
    In order to help them with the meanings I will use the context, definitions or example sentences. Besides, as soon as they get that SCARCE means “very little”, I can contrast it with ABUNDANT.
    (The greatest difficulty for me, though, will be to make them think and not to look up the words in their electronic dictionaries uploaded into mobile phones or other gadgets- unfortunately (or fortunately?) technology fascinates students so much that they often compete who will be the quickest to find the word…)

  • Alberto Rodriguez says:

    Hello Andrew,
    We first learn about denotation and connotation. Once the students have a grasp on these concepts we read any material (three times, sometimes). This works like a charm with ELL students as well as native speakers.

  • Ana Zivkovic says:

    I think my students (6th grade, 12-13 year old) would have trouble with words such as:
    1. scarce
    2. pitch in
    3. prevail
    4. retired
    5. revenues
    I would try to help them figure out the meaning of these words from context or give them examples of these words in other sentences making sure to use the words they already know.

  • Martin Laban Ibañez says:

    These are my key words

    1. To pitch in

    2. Turning point

    3. promissory notes

    4. prevail

    5. revenues

    To help student understand the vocabulary I would write on the board key example sentences with these words.

  • John McDermott Neill says:

    Hi everyone,
    My previous post seems to have disappeared so here goes again.
    I have based my choices in my current B1 class.

    remotely similar

    concept

    promissory notes

    best of circumstances

    pitch in

    I would try and elicit some ideas of what the target language might mean based on context. Then I would rephrase and if necessary introduce synonyms and try rephrasing the sentences again. After getting the students to work in pairs I would check understanding of any of the target language and elicit again. I think promissory note and pitch in would be
    beyond them so I would use a different context with synonyms and hope that would work.

    Great story. Sorry I missed the online class but I will watch the recording.
    Regards

  • Maythe Joshtony says:

    the words I think could be hrad for my student:
    vowed
    doubters
    embedded
    scarced
    reassuring

    first I will look up the words on the dictionary so I can find a picture that can explain the word for them justa by seing it to get and idea.

    I will ask my students to read the story and to write down the words they don`t understand and see if some of their classmates know the answer than I will paste the pictures so they`ll understand the words. 🙂

  • Rebeca González says:

    If I have to choose:
    1. to pitch in
    2. to live on
    3. take a leave of absence
    4. drive the message
    5. turning point
    I would use reading strategies. Ask Ss try to get meaning from the context, using context clues, key words.
    Write different sentences using the same phrases.
    Try to explain meaning with easy words.

  • Regina M A Trochez says:

    hotel chain,

    scarce

    leave of absence

    reassuring

    second-rate accommodations

    remotely similar

    promissory notes

    circumstances

  • Bila Treviño says:

    I must say it is a great story, thank you for sharing.
    With a reading comprehension class the words or expressions that could be a problem are:

    Paragraph 2 – doll
    paragraph 2 – lap
    paragraph 3 – plant
    paragraph 3 – drove
    paragraph 4 – sake
    paragraph 5 – turning point
    paragraph 6 – pitch in

    to find the meaning of this words a dictionary isn´t enough sometimes or the best option. context comprehension is necessary, it is important to remember that translating is not the same as interpreting a passage.

    To help students find the meaning of this words and expressions, as a teacher, I would put the word in another sentence; give synonyms, antonyms, or clues.

  • Da Thompson says:

    Dora Alicia Thompson
    Hi, to all of you. These are the words which I consider might be troublesome for learners:

    Scarce
    realized
    turning point
    accommodations
    figured
    prevail
    to pitch in
    embedded
    worth
    To help students to guess the meaning I use pictures related to the word. They look at the picture looking at the activities and making associations. All the class participate in a fun way.

  • Anastasia Bulatova says:

    H everyone! Due to some technical problems I couldn’t do the task on time, so if it’s not late – here is my answer: to vow, pitch in, embed, prevail, promissory note.
    I usually ask students not to look up the words in the dictionary and either guess them from context or give them defenitions and synonyms after what they use the new words in context sentenses and then make their own.

  • Julieta Millán says:

    – meat-packing
    – reassuring
    – vowed
    – prevail
    – sake
    – pitch in
    To make ss understand those words I would give them examples (sentences) using the words if it is possible I’d use pictures too.

  • Olga Savinova says:

    Here is my POST COURSE ASSIGNMENT for Andrew
    Weiler’s Monday Class on Teaching Vocabulary through Text. I’m going to help my students to come to the meaning of the following expressions: succeed, for my mother’s sake, remotely similar.

    At that moment, it became my mission in life to succeed for my mother’s sake, and I vowed never to be poor again.

    – succeed

    1. What part of speech is it? (verb)
    2. Can you name any other words with the same root? (success, successful)
    3. So “to succeed” means to be successful/to achieve a desired aim.
    4. Make your own sentences with the verb “succeed”.

    – for my mother’s sake

    1. Let’s read the whole paragraph and understand the situation. (When the Great Depression hit, my mom lost her job like millions of others. I was seventeen, and against Doll’s wishes, I left school to support the both of us.)
    2. Why did Kemmons leave the school? (Because Doll lost her job.)
    3. What was Kemmons going to do? (to support/ to help)
    4. So it was done in order to help the mother or for the mother’s sake (it’s more emphatic).
    5. Can you give any other expressions with the ward “sake”? (for Heaven’s sake).
    6. Have you ever done smth. for your mother’s/parent’s/friends’ sake? Or what are you ready to do for somebody’s sake?

    There were plenty of doubters who predicted failure because there wasn’t anything remotely similar to this concept at that time.
    – anything remotely similar

    1. Let’s concentrate on the structure of the sentences to understand what part of speech is it, paying attention to segmentation. (Suffix “-ly”, adv.)
    2. The adj. “Remote” means far away, small/slight.
    3. What kind of sentence is used in? (Negative) And the whole idea is that there was not anything more or less similar/the same/equal/alike.

    • Hi Olga!
      Looks great!!

      The only suggestion I would make is that with succeed, the grammatical analysis might be better placed after the meaning has been looked at…you might have had that in mind with what you were doing..as sometimes the grammar can actually help them zero in on the meaning

      • Olga Savinova says:

        Hi Andrew!
        Thank you for your suggestion. I agree with you, grammar helps to see/feel the meaning better. Sometimes it’s enought, it depends. Thanks once more.
        Best wishes,
        Olga

  • Valentina Saliy says:

    Andrew, is it necessary to email my Post Course Assignment to ur email box (with 5 trouble words for ss) n is one example posted here? Thank u

  • Narjes Ben Ammar says:

    Hello,
    Before answering this pre-assignment, I would like to highlight that the answer depends a lot on the level of the targeted students. Thus, I think the lowest level of students learning English as a second language that the given text could be given to is pre-intermediate.
    If we consider the students I deal with as pre-intermediate, among the words and expressions that can be disturbing for them, I would choose:
    1- chain
    2- scarce
    3- abundant
    4- vowed
    5- to pitch in
    There are different ways the teacher can explain difficult vocabulary without the need to translate or use the dictionary. For instance, I would ask the students if they understand the sentence which contains the disturbing vocabulary. If they didn’t, then I would paraphrase the whole sentence and simplify it which can help them get the meaning of the word or expression they find unclear. If they get the meaning of the sentence but still find problem understanding the expression itself, then I would try to use it in a different context which gives the same meaning, then I will ask the students to assimilate both sentences to get the meaning of the expression. It is also possible and helpful to use the derivatives of the word (if the word is a noun, I would use its verb, adjective or adverb, and vice versa).

  • Adeola Esther Oseni says:

    These are the choice of words my students might struggle with:
    reassuring
    second-rate
    remotely
    concept
    promissory notes
    revenues
    For intermediate learners, some of these words might pose challenges. However, I don’t think advanced learners will have problems with any word in the text.

  • Svetlana Guseva says:

    Dear Andrew,

    Thank you for the class. Here is my assignment.

    The story is full of good and useful expressions and
    collocations. I would choose

    1.
    “While food was scarce, my mother’s love and devotion were abundant . “ These are opposites so I can explain them using
    synonyms such as little and big so that the students can guess
    their meanings.

    2.
    “Over the years, I experienced varying levels of business success.” I
    would use a synonym different.

    3.
    “There were plenty of doubters who predicted failure because
    there wasn’t anything remotely
    similar to this concept at that time.” I
    would recall suffixes –er (for nouns denoting people) and –ly (for adverbs)

  • Jane Lee says:

    Hi Everyone! Very interesting task and simple a the same time! thanks a lot for sharing!

  • Jane Lee says:

    Pre-class assignment:

    1) Some expressions which could be troublesome for my studtnts:

    a) for a week at a time

    b) abundant

    c) to take a leave of absence from a job

    d) the real turning point

    e) anything remotely similar to this concept

    Explanations:

    a) In my opinion while teaching a language we should give a look at certain
    expression from the context. This expression shows that heroes were having
    “so little money” for a week periods of time and maybe not once but
    more often than that. Let student remind some more time expressions with
    preposition ‘for’ and ‘at’.

    b) This is an adjective, so we can offer some synonyms
    (plenty, heavy, rich, wealthy). Also add some collocations with these
    adjective: ‘abundant soil’, ‘abundant harvest’, ‘abundant love’, ect.

    c) We may offer to look at this expression in details:
    (verb) to take what? – (noun) a leave of what? – of absence where from? – (adverbial modifier
    of place) from a job. Look at the whole sentence: My mother took a leave of absence from her job at a meat-packing plant
    and moved into my hospital room to care for me. Offer students to make a
    questions: 1. Who took a leave of absence? 2. What did my mother do after she
    took a leave of absence? 3. What did she take a leave of absence for?

    d) But the real
    turning point occurred on a vacation I took with my wife and five kids in 1951.

    Turning is an adjective here, turning what? – point, find some collocations: a point of
    view, my point, etc. The meaning of this phrase is becoming clear after reading
    the whole passage where it is explained why it was ‘the real turning point’ and
    why it is so important for the hero to emphasize its significance.

    e) There
    were plenty of doubters who predicted failure because there wasn’t anything
    remotely similar to this concept at that time.

    Remotely is an adverb, same meaning with far away, not very clear,
    small, slightly. Similar (adjective) also has synonyms: the same, equal, alike.
    So 2 parts of speech goes together but are opposite in meaning and that reinforces
    the general meaning of this expression.

  • Jane Lee says:

    Pre-class assignment:

    1) Some expressions which could be troublesome for my studtnts:

    a) for a week at a time

    b) abundant

    c) to take a leave of absence from a job

    d) the real turning point

    e) anything remotely similar to this concept

    Explanations:

    a) In my opinion while teaching a language we should give a look at certain
    expression from the context. This expression shows that heroes were having
    “so little money” for a week periods of time and maybe not once but
    more often than that. Let student remind some more time expressions with
    preposition ‘for’ and ‘at’.

    b) This is an adjective, so we can offer some synonyms
    (plenty, heavy, rich, wealthy). Also add some collocations with these
    adjective: ‘abundant soil’, ‘abundant harvest’, ‘abundant love’, ect.

    c) We may offer to look at this expression in details:
    (verb) to take what? – (noun) a leave of what? – of absence where from? – (adverbial modifier
    of place) from a job. Look at the whole sentence: My mother took a leave of absence from her job at a meat-packing plant
    and moved into my hospital room to care for me. Offer students to make a
    questions: 1. Who took a leave of absence? 2. What did my mother do after she
    took a leave of absence? 3. What did she take a leave of absence for?

    d) But the real
    turning point occurred on a vacation I took with my wife and five kids in 1951.

    Turning is an adjective here, turning what? – point, find some collocations: a point of
    view, my point, etc. The meaning of this phrase is becoming clear after reading
    the whole passage where it is explained why it was ‘the real turning point’ and
    why it is so important for the hero to emphasize its significance.

    e) There
    were plenty of doubters who predicted failure because there wasn’t anything
    remotely similar to this concept at that time.

    Remotely is an adverb, same meaning with far away, not very clear,
    small, slightly. Similar (adjective) also has synonyms: the same, equal, alike.
    So 2 parts of speech goes together but are opposite in meaning and that
    reinforces the general meaning of this expression.

  • Rebeca González says:

    Post Course Asignment

    Bring out-

    Is bring a noun? Verb?

    What do people bring out sometimes?

    Who brings out the best of Wilson?

    Who brings out the best of you?

    Write a sentence

    Took a leave of absence

    Who took a leave of absence in the story?

    Why? What happened when Wilson was 14?

    Where did her mother move?

    So, she took a leave of absence, from what?

    Have you take a leave of absence? when?

    Write a sentence

    Worth working for

    Wilson found a mission in life worth working for.
    Which one is it?

    Why is this mission worth working for?

    Do you have a mission in life worth working for?

    I think … is a mission in life worth working for

    Write a sentence

    I would like to ask students to write a small paragraph about them using the new vocabulary.

    • HI Rebeca,
      It looks like you are well on the road. Sometimes the grammar of the sentence will be something worth talking about, other times it may well be superfluous. You will develop a sense for that if you keep your eye on the goal ( teasing out the meaning from what they read).

      Sometimes you might need mores sentences, sometimes less…you will see.

      Well done!!
      🙂

  • Intissar Jaouadi says:

    Hi.

    Pre- assignment:

    I think the follwing words would be challenging to my students:
    – abundant

    – reassuring
    – turning point
    – average
    – prevail

    I would teach the meaning of those words in the context of the text.

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